WordPress: Users or Losers

WordPress Blogging Background

Administering a WordPress site isn’t easy, and for anyone new to the application that is expecting a straightforward website building experience, they’ll be in for an unpleasant surprise. Whenever dealing with WordPress, it’s always important to remember its original purpose, publishing. That means whether you planned for it or not, user management is a fundamental skill that’s required if you want to have any success with WordPress. So what’s the best way to handle it?

Authentication

The best place to start is understanding the method by which people can access your site. Because WordPress’s core functionality is blogging, the application offers individuals outside of an organization the ability to create profiles, enabling users to follow posts and make comments. Any additional capabilities that are available to these users are managed by the site’s Administrator, which might be a new responsibility for anyone transitioning from Wix or Squarespace.

It all starts with deciding if visitors can create a profile. Yes, that’s correct, admins can toggle the ability for outsiders to create profiles by entering the Settings – General, menu, and checking, or unchecking, the “Anyone can register” option.

WordPress Setting Screen
The Membership Option in General Settings

If administrators decide to enable users to create profiles, it’s a best practice to install additional features that provide assistance with user management. Anti-span tools, as well as adding a second level of authentication, are the first steps in hardening access to WordPress. One of our favorite plugins on this topic is Simple Google reCAPTCHA by Michal Novak.

Setting up a Google Recaptcha Account will take some work, but the effectiveness of the plugin is great, and it’s free to use. ReCAPTCHA technology adds a puzzle to areas of WordPress that contain forms, asking users to complete basic interactions before being able to submit the data. Its addition to the profile creation and contact forms do a great job of preventing an explosion in fake users.

Authorization

After making sure the only people who can access WordPress are authentic, the next step is making sure they aren’t authorized to carry out any nefarious deeds. Every authenticated user is assigned a set of privileges called Capabilities. Capabilities determine if users are able to carry out certain tasks, like creating posts or adding users. Most user’s capabilities are predetermined based on which Role the user has been assigned.

Roles are categories of users that almost all applications use to quickly assign permissions to users. In the case of WordPress, most roles relate to publishing duties, like Author, Editor, and Contributor, but the default Role for new profiles is set to Subscriber. With that in mind, it’s not enough to simply have awareness of Roles, administrators have to know how to manage them.

As more plugins are added to a site, they create a variety of new Roles during the installation process. The plugins create these roles because the preinstalled ones are related to publishing, making them insufficient for their needs. At RTR Digital, we rely on Members, by MemberPress, to manage the Roles within our site.

Accounting

Lastly, there is accounting. Most people always associate the term, “accounting,” with money, but in IT, we use it in a different manner. When it comes to user management, accounting is about creating a log of interactions so administrators can associate them to individual users. For example, if a user changes their password, the application records that action in its log. Later, if that user has an issue with their credentials, the application has a method to show the last time changes were made.

Unfortunately, WordPress doesn’t offer a native feature for accounting, so a plugin is your only option for adding it to the application. Our recommendation is Simple History by Par Thernstrom. Simple History is a lightweight plugin that creates a log of any significant actions in WordPress and displays them on the Dashboard. Adding the Simple History plugin to WordPress will quickly open your eyes to the volume of bad actors in the IT space. Simply tracking the number of times a hacker tries to log in as “admin” will blow your mind, and give you a new perspective on the importance of security.

User Security

In fact, everything in this article is about providing a basic level of security to WordPress. It’s the responsibility of every administrator to provide their users with a level of security that keeps them safe. Even if you aren’t a security expert, the plugins mentioned in this article will get you heading in the right direction.

Information on important topics, like user management, is just a portion of the critical topics we cover in our WordPress Essentials eLearning. If you’re interested in learning more, click here.

WordPress Essentials Preview

Top Ten Tips: SEO Edition #4

SEO Tip 4

Over the years, there have been a lot of fancy SEO tools emerging in the marketplace. As part of the effort to make SEO more accessible to non-developers, the first principle is disappearing in the shuffle – keyword management. The core premise of SEO involves making sure the links that appear on search engine results pages (SERPs) are closely related to the words that users type in the search bar, and for that to happen, multiple data points have to converge. As it so happens, all these data points rely on keyword associations.

Keywords are a bit complicated, as most people only understand them from a single perspective. Searchers view them as the words entered into the search bar. Advertisers see them as words that trigger ads. Lastly, developers view them as copy on a website. So which one are they? They’re all of the above, and the synchronization of all of these elements is what produces real SEO results, so I can’t overstate how important it is that you manage your keywords at all times.

Think Like a Customer

Online Purchase

The best advice I ever received from a fellow SEO expert was, “think like a customer and everything else will follow.” Much to his credit, he understood something I didn’t know about internet users, they don’t know the rules of running queries, and keeping that in mind can make all the difference. Typical users input broadly-worded terms as if they are infants learning a language through word association, entering things like, “running shoes,” or “Selma Hayek,” hoping the search engine rewards them by presenting the appropriate object in the same way a parent does when their child learns the word “bottle.”

In contrast to those actions, search engines perform best when users ask proper questions that start with who, what, when, where, and how. Imagine how much better those queries results would be with context like, “Where can I buy running shoes,” or “who do I need to eliminate to date Selma Hayek?” Details like this are essential to consider when working on SEO from the advertising or web development perspectives because we’ll never be able to control the words users enter into search bars.

To give this part of the post some context, we want you to know the top search terms of 2019 through April (https://ahrefs.com/blog/top-google-searches/). You should take note of the quantity, context, and specificity of the words on this list. Most of the world’s queries are singular, service oriented, and brand specific. If your company is on that list, you can probably skip the next section as most of your traffic flows to your website organically, but As for the rest of us, we have to take the intermediate step of paid advertising.

Be the Advertiser

Person pointing to chart

Once you get a clear idea of how people search for things on the internet, you’ll be better equipped to create keywords for your advertising campaigns. Keywords for advertisers serve as the link between what terms online users enter in the search bar, and the products and services a company offers. Precisely picking which words and associations to use is a skill set in and of itself, and we don’t have time to cover that in this post.

If you have ever set up a search advertising campaign through Google, Yahoo, or Bing, you’re probably aware the keywords associated with an ad are manually entered, and it’s entirely up to the advertisers to play the word association game all on their own. If you have the right mindset, one where you’re thinking like your potential customers, then selecting which words to use as triggers for your advertisements comes a bit more naturally than those who are still struggling to remove industry buzzwords from their vocabulary.

Even when you’ve figured out the best words to trigger your ads, you’ll still have to connect the last data point before your website’s SEO really starts to take off. Because most advertisements are designed to be visually appealing, and they don’t include much text, search engines have to gauge the effectiveness of your advertising keywords by how visitors behave when they reach your website. If your ads aren’t producing clicks, or leading visitors to pages that contain any of the keywords associated with the ad, search engines will punish you by lowering the chances your ads appear.

Keywords Count

The easiest way to make sure your ads continue to appear when users enter matching terms in a search bar, and maybe even make it to the 1st page, is by making sure the landing page contains the keywords in the web page’s text. The web page needs to include the words in repetition, and in such a way where it seems natural and doesn’t give search engines the impression you’re “keyword stuffing.” Because the focus of modern websites is often visual, much like advertising, this process sounds a lot easier than it is.

In an earlier post, we warned everybody about the overuse of pictures when designing a website, and this is the moment that advice comes full circle. In that post we noted that search engines couldn’t decipher the content of images, so to figure out what a page is about, they count the number of times words appear on a page and assign those as keywords. Even if you’ve had great success with aligning your keywords up to this point, without matching the actual words on the page to the user’s previous associations, not only will all of your hard work unravel, it will reverse course.

If a search engine observes negative behaviors when users land on a page, like hitting the back button or quickly closing the browser window, search engines determine the final destination was not useful for a particular set of keywords. The search engine responds by lowering the page’s relevance score, making it even tougher for your ads, and website, to appear in association with those keywords. Considering the brutality of the punishment for delivering irrelevant content, I’m always surprised how many businesses don’t know their keywords or haven’t taken any steps to figure them out.

An Easy Fix

We’re pretty far along in our sequence of SEO tips, and if you’re still able to execute this advice on your own, good for you. If you’re not in that boat, but your business heavily relies on internet traffic, it’s time to reach out to an expert. RTR Digital provides a variety of SEO related services, and you can have someone contact you by filling out a short form located here.

How The Model 3 is Destroying Tesla

Tesla Model 3

If the story of Tesla was somehow a metaphor for stories from the Bible, then the Model 3 is Judas making sure everyone at Tesla is on their way to the last supper, assuring their shepherd is approaching his final resting place (that cross is for you Elon). Maybe it was always Tesla’s destiny to be a sacrificial lamb of sorts, ending up in the same situation as many other pioneering companies, often not lasting long enough to see the technology they introduce make it to mainstream profitability. Ultimately, the Model 3 will bring forth a real test of faith in electric car kingdom that Tesla built.

You see, the Model 3 betrays everything consumers love about Tesla, and at the same time reveals those in charge of the company don’t understand their clientele at all. As it turns out, car companies in America only operate in two models, high volume or high margin, and with each comes a specific set of expectations that have to be met if you want to continue in that space. Tesla was the latter, high margin, but the Model 3 changed everything.

Exclusivity

The first expectation of running a high margin, or premium brand, is exclusivity, which when speaking plainly, means these brands produce a low volume of products. Premium brands often justify their product scarcity by including extravagant materials or assembly methods as a part of their production process, enabling product owners to reference things like hand-stitched leather, individually assembled, or first of its kind, when talking to others about their new toys.

Model X with Falcon Doors Open
Photo courtesy of Mashable.com

In Tesla’s case, it’s Falcon Wing doors on the Model X, Ludicrous mode on the Model S, and street legal lithium batteries on the Roadster, that check all the appropriate branding boxes for a premium brand. These features, combined with lower product availability, meant consumers looked forward to random encounters with the vehicles in real life, hoping to catch a glimpse of how a Tesla embodies the concept of cool. Then came the Model 3.

The Model 3 is a contradiction in how premium brands operate, and when Tesla announced it at a $35K price point with the specific goal of being a mass-market vehicle, I could almost hear the other Tesla owners cringing. In the minds of premium brand owners, the proliferation of the Tesla badge to everybody and their mother would seemingly make the symbol on their vehicle less valuable, as if they were mathematically averaging the prices of the cars together. American’s don’t tolerate this kind of behavior. You can’t use the same branding for bargain vehicles as you do for premium ones.

Tesla’s could have easily avoided this mistake by using the same branding strategy as every other car manufacturer in America. In “Merica,” car companies use different brands to divide their consumer base between their operating models, one brand for volume, and another one for margin. That’s why there’s a GM and Cadillac, Infinite and Nissan, Ford and Lincoln, etc.

This two prong approach has enabled U.S. car manufacturers to maintain a certain amount of exclusivity on some brands, while simultaneously achieving the cost efficiencies of scale with another. More importantly, the dual branding strategy protects another expectation of premium brands – cost.

The Cost Correlation

Time to Cost Correlation

When there’s a limited supply of anything, most of the time, the cost of that product naturally increases, delivering a price point that inherently leads to more margin. Premium brands use this natural correlation of exclusivity and cost to perpetuate their brands further, promoting an emotional response that evokes admiration and envy. The combination of these two emotions is what brand experts like to refer to as aspirational, and Ferrari is a perfect example of an aspirational brand.

Do you know why I don’t drive a Ferrari? I can’t afford one, and for the people that can, that is part of the allure of owning one. For everyone with the same budgetary constraints as myself, the astronomical price tag associated with a Ferrari isn’t off-putting, it provides an immediate understanding that a person driving one must be doing pretty well for themselves and makes us wonder how we can achieve the same thing.

Tesla’s vehicles used to inspire the same type of awe as a Ferrari when they pulled into a parking lot, but the release of a reasonably priced version calls everything we know about the brand into question. A Tesla never had the practicality of a Nissan Leaf or the design of a Toyota Prius, and surely didn’t carry a similar price tag. A Tesla was always expensive, exclusive, and impractical, just like an aspirational car brand should be. All of that went out of the window with the Model 3.

Before the Model 3, when people asked me about owning a Tesla, my answer was the same as it is concerning a Ferrari, “I can’t afford one.” Since the release of the Model 3, it’s different, when people ask me why I don’t drive a Tesla, I have to consider if I really want one. Being able to afford one has forced me to consider the features of a Tesla, like reliability, charging time, and driving distance. I had to ask myself, is this the best car for me at 35K? For a lot of consumers, the answer to that question is no, which proposes some harsh realities for Tesla, and the future of electric cars.

Tesla’s Red Pill

Red Pill and Blue Pill

The reason the Model 3 ruined everything about Tesla is that it snapped everyone back to reality, not just consumers, but Tesla was well. Besides exposing previously oblivious consumers to serious considerations about owning an electric vehicle, it also presented questions about Tesla as a car company. The effort to reach critical mass has surfaced several issues about various aspects of Tesla, making everyone consider if they have the production capacity, infrastructure, and sales tools of a high volume brand.

In the end, the production Model 3 broke the rules of a premium brand and made us all lose faith in the dream that made Tesla great. All we’re left with is the harsh reality of having taken the red pill rather than the blue one. I should have heeded the advice of Cypher in the Matrix and realized “ignorance is bliss.”

Feel free to leave comments, questions, or concerns about this article below.