Top Ten Tips: SEO Edition #6

SEO Tip 6

Good things come to those that wait, a great Heinz slogan for ketchup, but a horrible mantra for SEO. While patience is a virtue, if you’re employing it in relation to SEO rankings, you might want to re-think your course of action. Google, Yahoo, and Bing regularly crawl the entire internet looking for more content, and most website owners seem content with waiting their turn, but there is a faster way to get your website noticed then a periodic site crawl. It’s time to introduce you to webmaster tools.

Webmaster Tools

Every major search engine company provides a set of tools to assist owners in managing the performance of their websites. Of course, Google’s is the most robust because they offer more tools than any other provider, but there are others out there that are worth your time. You can find these tools with a quick online search, or you can click the link in this sentence to navigate to Google, Yahoo, Bing, and Yandex’s respective pages.

To be honest, when you get there it probably won’t be what you’re at all expecting. All of the SEO tips (#10,#9,#8,#7) leading up to this point have been reasonably achievable for novices, but webmaster tools are usually the ”make or break” mark for the do-it-yourself crowd. That’s okay because the page is genuinely designed for developers. Even signing into webmaster tools requires a developer account, so you know you’re officially moving up to the next level when you get to this step.

Google Search Console

Once you’re logged in, there will be lots of menus and options available. If you’ve made it this far, don’t get distracted, find the area of the tools that enable you to request a crawling of your website. In Google’s Webmaster Tools (Google Search Console), which I’m sure is the one most readers are concerned about, that would be the ”URL Inspection” tool, but requesting a search engine crawl a website is only one-third of the process of correctly indexing your site.

So What’s Next?

Before clicking around and instructing Google’s crawler to its job, like it’s a college student amid their first internship, you’ll want to have a robot.txt and sitemap file ready for upload. By now, you’re probably starting to notice the amount of work required to manage your site’s SEO is beginning to add up to a lot of hours. And this is as good of a time as any to think about reaching out to a professional for help because, spoiler alert, things are about to get a bit trickier.

Next Exit

Let’s start with the sitemap, a file with a function precisely as it reads, providing a text version of the site layout, so search engines know what to expect when they visit. Developers often create these files because they require some text encoding to assure the proper format. After crawling a site, the search engine reconciles what the sitemap said should be there, versus what it found.

The robots.txt file is complimentary to the sitemap mentioned above. This file provides a set of instructions to the search engine, telling it what it can, or can’t, crawl. This file is especially important for those using WordPress, Wix, Squarespace, and other site building applications because there are a lot of menu pages that are a part of the interface, but aren’t relevant to search engines. In some cases, it may even be a security risk for those pages to appear in results.

Last Chance to Tap Out

If you’re still reading this, and more importantly, awaiting our next post in the series, it means you’re all in. You’re also halfway home, as there are only five more posts left before you’ve completed all ten tips.  If you’re just waiting for the link to contact us, so we can do the heavy lifting for you, it’s right here.

RTR Digital’s has expertise in advanced SEO and digital solutions, and everyone is entitled to a complimentary SEO evaluation after they’ve filled out the contact form.

If you have any questions or comments related to this post, feel free to leave them in the appropriate section of this page.

The Gig Economy’s Death Cross

Financial Charts

Financial markets have some predetermined signals that are supposed to alert investors that the bottom is getting ready to fall out of the market. One of the more popular indicators is the “Death Cross,” which happens when the short term average value (usually 50 days) of a stock falls below the long term average value (usually 200 days). Some financial advisors argue this means a stock has peaked and you can expect a long term downward trend to begin, and we’ll theorize a similar indicator exists for the gig economy.

Market Share Over Profitability

Burning Money

The gig economy is Silicon Valley’s most extreme version of the Software as a Service (SaaS) business model. A business model that, as noted in a previous post, we think offers no long term value to the economy or the consumers that are using it. We’ve concluded this based on the fact the those who participate in this type of business model are offering services well below fair market value to gain market share, without concern over how the business will eventually reach profitability.

Because these businesses are offering services at an unprofitable level, they are easily identifiable by their high cash burn rates and the fact their operations are usually subsidized through private investment capital or early-stage Initial Public Offerings (IPOs). The list of notable companies we consider to be a part of this group is Uber, Lyft, Instacart, DoorDash, MoviePass, etc., and a variety of scandals have emerged over how some of these companies are paying their “contractors.”

Each one of these companies facilitates a connection between an end-user and service provider with the hopes of receiving a piece of the action – the very definition of a middle man. The problem is a middle man can’t earn any money in a non-profitable endeavor, and the results are beginning to show, something that should worry anyone associated with these companies.

It Can’t be that Bad

Borrowing Money

Take Uber for example, which has a well-publicized issue with driver wages falling below, or being just above minimum wage. With labor rates so low (a goal of so many organizations), many would imagine Uber must be a highly profitable business, but according to self-reported earnings, Uber’s losses are widening, and growth is slowing. These reports are leaving some early investors wondering if they will ever see a return on their investment, with the only possible fix to the situation being a significant increase in service rates.

In other news, MoviePass’s recent spiral has also been high-publicized as it continues to restructure pricing and access for its users to shave their massive losses. The most recent changes resulting in a lower number of users on the platform and higher prices for those customers that remain, although the only metric anyone cares about is the 126 million dollars in losses.

Even Lyft, which seems to attract fewer negative public relations mentions than the previous companies, has been forced to make some changes. Since Lyft also doesn’t have a profitable structure, recent changes in minimum wage laws have forced them to raise their rates to guarantee their drivers earn a living wage.

How to Create a Death Cross

In case you haven’t noticed the trend, time vets all business models, and the fix for all of these businesses is the same – they have to raise prices. The problem is most of their users have been acquired based on the price point of the service, not on its quality; therefore, the inevitable result of raising prices is a decrease in users.

It’s quite simple when you boil it down to most simple mathematical elements. On the hand, you have the price of the service, and on the other, you have the number of user on the platform. As the price goes up, the number of users comes down, and at some point, these two lines will overlap creating the “Gig Economy Death Cross.”

Death Cross

The Gig Economy Death Cross represents a sobering reality for these business models. At its core, it’s the maximum rate they can charge for their service before the user loss becomes unreasonable, and the resulting evaluation will determine if the company is dead on arrival.

Take the dollar amount at the point of intersection, multiply it by the number of users to estimate the revenue earned, and then subtract the company’s expenses. If the resulting number is in the red, I suggest you start polishing up that resume.

It’s always convenient for believers in these businesses to argue that an evaluation of this kind is too simplistic, we would counter by illustrating most of the business community’s longest standing principles are along these lines. Beliefs like, supply and demand, or word-of-mouth is the best advertising, have long stood the test of time, so it’s hard for us to comprehend how something like needing to generate more money than you spend could have slipped through the cracks.

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