Top Ten Tips: SEO Edition #4

SEO Tip 4

Over the years, there have been a lot of fancy SEO tools emerging in the marketplace. As part of the effort to make SEO more accessible to non-developers, the first principle is disappearing in the shuffle – keyword management. The core premise of SEO involves making sure the links that appear on search engine results pages (SERPs) are closely related to the words that users type in the search bar, and for that to happen, multiple data points have to converge. As it so happens, all these data points rely on keyword associations.

Keywords are a bit complicated, as most people only understand them from a single perspective. Searchers view them as the words entered into the search bar. Advertisers see them as words that trigger ads. Lastly, developers view them as copy on a website. So which one are they? They’re all of the above, and the synchronization of all of these elements is what produces real SEO results, so I can’t overstate how important it is that you manage your keywords at all times.

Think Like a Customer

Online Purchase

The best advice I ever received from a fellow SEO expert was, “think like a customer and everything else will follow.” Much to his credit, he understood something I didn’t know about internet users, they don’t know the rules of running queries, and keeping that in mind can make all the difference. Typical users input broadly-worded terms as if they are infants learning a language through word association, entering things like, “running shoes,” or “Selma Hayek,” hoping the search engine rewards them by presenting the appropriate object in the same way a parent does when their child learns the word “bottle.”

In contrast to those actions, search engines perform best when users ask proper questions that start with who, what, when, where, and how. Imagine how much better those queries results would be with context like, “Where can I buy running shoes,” or “who do I need to eliminate to date Selma Hayek?” Details like this are essential to consider when working on SEO from the advertising or web development perspectives because we’ll never be able to control the words users enter into search bars.

To give this part of the post some context, we want you to know the top search terms of 2019 through April (https://ahrefs.com/blog/top-google-searches/). You should take note of the quantity, context, and specificity of the words on this list. Most of the world’s queries are singular, service oriented, and brand specific. If your company is on that list, you can probably skip the next section as most of your traffic flows to your website organically, but As for the rest of us, we have to take the intermediate step of paid advertising.

Be the Advertiser

Person pointing to chart

Once you get a clear idea of how people search for things on the internet, you’ll be better equipped to create keywords for your advertising campaigns. Keywords for advertisers serve as the link between what terms online users enter in the search bar, and the products and services a company offers. Precisely picking which words and associations to use is a skill set in and of itself, and we don’t have time to cover that in this post.

If you have ever set up a search advertising campaign through Google, Yahoo, or Bing, you’re probably aware the keywords associated with an ad are manually entered, and it’s entirely up to the advertisers to play the word association game all on their own. If you have the right mindset, one where you’re thinking like your potential customers, then selecting which words to use as triggers for your advertisements comes a bit more naturally than those who are still struggling to remove industry buzzwords from their vocabulary.

Even when you’ve figured out the best words to trigger your ads, you’ll still have to connect the last data point before your website’s SEO really starts to take off. Because most advertisements are designed to be visually appealing, and they don’t include much text, search engines have to gauge the effectiveness of your advertising keywords by how visitors behave when they reach your website. If your ads aren’t producing clicks, or leading visitors to pages that contain any of the keywords associated with the ad, search engines will punish you by lowering the chances your ads appear.

Keywords Count

The easiest way to make sure your ads continue to appear when users enter matching terms in a search bar, and maybe even make it to the 1st page, is by making sure the landing page contains the keywords in the web page’s text. The web page needs to include the words in repetition, and in such a way where it seems natural and doesn’t give search engines the impression you’re “keyword stuffing.” Because the focus of modern websites is often visual, much like advertising, this process sounds a lot easier than it is.

In an earlier post, we warned everybody about the overuse of pictures when designing a website, and this is the moment that advice comes full circle. In that post we noted that search engines couldn’t decipher the content of images, so to figure out what a page is about, they count the number of times words appear on a page and assign those as keywords. Even if you’ve had great success with aligning your keywords up to this point, without matching the actual words on the page to the user’s previous associations, not only will all of your hard work unravel, it will reverse course.

If a search engine observes negative behaviors when users land on a page, like hitting the back button or quickly closing the browser window, search engines determine the final destination was not useful for a particular set of keywords. The search engine responds by lowering the page’s relevance score, making it even tougher for your ads, and website, to appear in association with those keywords. Considering the brutality of the punishment for delivering irrelevant content, I’m always surprised how many businesses don’t know their keywords or haven’t taken any steps to figure them out.

An Easy Fix

We’re pretty far along in our sequence of SEO tips, and if you’re still able to execute this advice on your own, good for you. If you’re not in that boat, but your business heavily relies on internet traffic, it’s time to reach out to an expert. RTR Digital provides a variety of SEO related services, and you can have someone contact you by filling out a short form located here.

Top Ten Tips: SEO Edition #6

SEO Tip 6

Good things come to those that wait, a great Heinz slogan for ketchup, but a horrible mantra for SEO. While patience is a virtue, if you’re employing it in relation to SEO rankings, you might want to re-think your course of action. Google, Yahoo, and Bing regularly crawl the entire internet looking for more content, and most website owners seem content with waiting their turn, but there is a faster way to get your website noticed then a periodic site crawl. It’s time to introduce you to webmaster tools.

Webmaster Tools

Every major search engine company provides a set of tools to assist owners in managing the performance of their websites. Of course, Google’s is the most robust because they offer more tools than any other provider, but there are others out there that are worth your time. You can find these tools with a quick online search, or you can click the link in this sentence to navigate to Google, Yahoo, Bing, and Yandex’s respective pages.

To be honest, when you get there it probably won’t be what you’re at all expecting. All of the SEO tips (#10,#9,#8,#7) leading up to this point have been reasonably achievable for novices, but webmaster tools are usually the ”make or break” mark for the do-it-yourself crowd. That’s okay because the page is genuinely designed for developers. Even signing into webmaster tools requires a developer account, so you know you’re officially moving up to the next level when you get to this step.

Google Search Console

Once you’re logged in, there will be lots of menus and options available. If you’ve made it this far, don’t get distracted, find the area of the tools that enable you to request a crawling of your website. In Google’s Webmaster Tools (Google Search Console), which I’m sure is the one most readers are concerned about, that would be the ”URL Inspection” tool, but requesting a search engine crawl a website is only one-third of the process of correctly indexing your site.

So What’s Next?

Before clicking around and instructing Google’s crawler to its job, like it’s a college student amid their first internship, you’ll want to have a robot.txt and sitemap file ready for upload. By now, you’re probably starting to notice the amount of work required to manage your site’s SEO is beginning to add up to a lot of hours. And this is as good of a time as any to think about reaching out to a professional for help because, spoiler alert, things are about to get a bit trickier.

Next Exit

Let’s start with the sitemap, a file with a function precisely as it reads, providing a text version of the site layout, so search engines know what to expect when they visit. Developers often create these files because they require some text encoding to assure the proper format. After crawling a site, the search engine reconciles what the sitemap said should be there, versus what it found.

The robots.txt file is complimentary to the sitemap mentioned above. This file provides a set of instructions to the search engine, telling it what it can, or can’t, crawl. This file is especially important for those using WordPress, Wix, Squarespace, and other site building applications because there are a lot of menu pages that are a part of the interface, but aren’t relevant to search engines. In some cases, it may even be a security risk for those pages to appear in results.

Last Chance to Tap Out

If you’re still reading this, and more importantly, awaiting our next post in the series, it means you’re all in. You’re also halfway home, as there are only five more posts left before you’ve completed all ten tips.  If you’re just waiting for the link to contact us, so we can do the heavy lifting for you, it’s right here.

RTR Digital’s has expertise in advanced SEO and digital solutions, and everyone is entitled to a complimentary SEO evaluation after they’ve filled out the contact form.

If you have any questions or comments related to this post, feel free to leave them in the appropriate section of this page.

The Gig Economy’s Death Cross

Financial Charts

Financial markets have some predetermined signals that are supposed to alert investors that the bottom is getting ready to fall out of the market. One of the more popular indicators is the “Death Cross,” which happens when the short term average value (usually 50 days) of a stock falls below the long term average value (usually 200 days). Some financial advisors argue this means a stock has peaked and you can expect a long term downward trend to begin, and we’ll theorize a similar indicator exists for the gig economy.

Market Share Over Profitability

Burning Money

The gig economy is Silicon Valley’s most extreme version of the Software as a Service (SaaS) business model. A business model that, as noted in a previous post, we think offers no long term value to the economy or the consumers that are using it. We’ve concluded this based on the fact the those who participate in this type of business model are offering services well below fair market value to gain market share, without concern over how the business will eventually reach profitability.

Because these businesses are offering services at an unprofitable level, they are easily identifiable by their high cash burn rates and the fact their operations are usually subsidized through private investment capital or early-stage Initial Public Offerings (IPOs). The list of notable companies we consider to be a part of this group is Uber, Lyft, Instacart, DoorDash, MoviePass, etc., and a variety of scandals have emerged over how some of these companies are paying their “contractors.”

Each one of these companies facilitates a connection between an end-user and service provider with the hopes of receiving a piece of the action – the very definition of a middle man. The problem is a middle man can’t earn any money in a non-profitable endeavor, and the results are beginning to show, something that should worry anyone associated with these companies.

It Can’t be that Bad

Borrowing Money

Take Uber for example, which has a well-publicized issue with driver wages falling below, or being just above minimum wage. With labor rates so low (a goal of so many organizations), many would imagine Uber must be a highly profitable business, but according to self-reported earnings, Uber’s losses are widening, and growth is slowing. These reports are leaving some early investors wondering if they will ever see a return on their investment, with the only possible fix to the situation being a significant increase in service rates.

In other news, MoviePass’s recent spiral has also been high-publicized as it continues to restructure pricing and access for its users to shave their massive losses. The most recent changes resulting in a lower number of users on the platform and higher prices for those customers that remain, although the only metric anyone cares about is the 126 million dollars in losses.

Even Lyft, which seems to attract fewer negative public relations mentions than the previous companies, has been forced to make some changes. Since Lyft also doesn’t have a profitable structure, recent changes in minimum wage laws have forced them to raise their rates to guarantee their drivers earn a living wage.

How to Create a Death Cross

In case you haven’t noticed the trend, time vets all business models, and the fix for all of these businesses is the same – they have to raise prices. The problem is most of their users have been acquired based on the price point of the service, not on its quality; therefore, the inevitable result of raising prices is a decrease in users.

It’s quite simple when you boil it down to most simple mathematical elements. On the hand, you have the price of the service, and on the other, you have the number of user on the platform. As the price goes up, the number of users comes down, and at some point, these two lines will overlap creating the “Gig Economy Death Cross.”

Death Cross

The Gig Economy Death Cross represents a sobering reality for these business models. At its core, it’s the maximum rate they can charge for their service before the user loss becomes unreasonable, and the resulting evaluation will determine if the company is dead on arrival.

Take the dollar amount at the point of intersection, multiply it by the number of users to estimate the revenue earned, and then subtract the company’s expenses. If the resulting number is in the red, I suggest you start polishing up that resume.

It’s always convenient for believers in these businesses to argue that an evaluation of this kind is too simplistic, we would counter by illustrating most of the business community’s longest standing principles are along these lines. Beliefs like, supply and demand, or word-of-mouth is the best advertising, have long stood the test of time, so it’s hard for us to comprehend how something like needing to generate more money than you spend could have slipped through the cracks.

Please leave any comments or questions about this post in the section below.