Top Ten Tips: SEO Edition #4

SEO Tip 4

Over the years, there have been a lot of fancy SEO tools emerging in the marketplace. As part of the effort to make SEO more accessible to non-developers, the first principle is disappearing in the shuffle – keyword management. The core premise of SEO involves making sure the links that appear on search engine results pages (SERPs) are closely related to the words that users type in the search bar, and for that to happen, multiple data points have to converge. As it so happens, all these data points rely on keyword associations.

Keywords are a bit complicated, as most people only understand them from a single perspective. Searchers view them as the words entered into the search bar. Advertisers see them as words that trigger ads. Lastly, developers view them as copy on a website. So which one are they? They’re all of the above, and the synchronization of all of these elements is what produces real SEO results, so I can’t overstate how important it is that you manage your keywords at all times.

Think Like a Customer

Online Purchase

The best advice I ever received from a fellow SEO expert was, “think like a customer and everything else will follow.” Much to his credit, he understood something I didn’t know about internet users, they don’t know the rules of running queries, and keeping that in mind can make all the difference. Typical users input broadly-worded terms as if they are infants learning a language through word association, entering things like, “running shoes,” or “Selma Hayek,” hoping the search engine rewards them by presenting the appropriate object in the same way a parent does when their child learns the word “bottle.”

In contrast to those actions, search engines perform best when users ask proper questions that start with who, what, when, where, and how. Imagine how much better those queries results would be with context like, “Where can I buy running shoes,” or “who do I need to eliminate to date Selma Hayek?” Details like this are essential to consider when working on SEO from the advertising or web development perspectives because we’ll never be able to control the words users enter into search bars.

To give this part of the post some context, we want you to know the top search terms of 2019 through April (https://ahrefs.com/blog/top-google-searches/). You should take note of the quantity, context, and specificity of the words on this list. Most of the world’s queries are singular, service oriented, and brand specific. If your company is on that list, you can probably skip the next section as most of your traffic flows to your website organically, but As for the rest of us, we have to take the intermediate step of paid advertising.

Be the Advertiser

Person pointing to chart

Once you get a clear idea of how people search for things on the internet, you’ll be better equipped to create keywords for your advertising campaigns. Keywords for advertisers serve as the link between what terms online users enter in the search bar, and the products and services a company offers. Precisely picking which words and associations to use is a skill set in and of itself, and we don’t have time to cover that in this post.

If you have ever set up a search advertising campaign through Google, Yahoo, or Bing, you’re probably aware the keywords associated with an ad are manually entered, and it’s entirely up to the advertisers to play the word association game all on their own. If you have the right mindset, one where you’re thinking like your potential customers, then selecting which words to use as triggers for your advertisements comes a bit more naturally than those who are still struggling to remove industry buzzwords from their vocabulary.

Even when you’ve figured out the best words to trigger your ads, you’ll still have to connect the last data point before your website’s SEO really starts to take off. Because most advertisements are designed to be visually appealing, and they don’t include much text, search engines have to gauge the effectiveness of your advertising keywords by how visitors behave when they reach your website. If your ads aren’t producing clicks, or leading visitors to pages that contain any of the keywords associated with the ad, search engines will punish you by lowering the chances your ads appear.

Keywords Count

The easiest way to make sure your ads continue to appear when users enter matching terms in a search bar, and maybe even make it to the 1st page, is by making sure the landing page contains the keywords in the web page’s text. The web page needs to include the words in repetition, and in such a way where it seems natural and doesn’t give search engines the impression you’re “keyword stuffing.” Because the focus of modern websites is often visual, much like advertising, this process sounds a lot easier than it is.

In an earlier post, we warned everybody about the overuse of pictures when designing a website, and this is the moment that advice comes full circle. In that post we noted that search engines couldn’t decipher the content of images, so to figure out what a page is about, they count the number of times words appear on a page and assign those as keywords. Even if you’ve had great success with aligning your keywords up to this point, without matching the actual words on the page to the user’s previous associations, not only will all of your hard work unravel, it will reverse course.

If a search engine observes negative behaviors when users land on a page, like hitting the back button or quickly closing the browser window, search engines determine the final destination was not useful for a particular set of keywords. The search engine responds by lowering the page’s relevance score, making it even tougher for your ads, and website, to appear in association with those keywords. Considering the brutality of the punishment for delivering irrelevant content, I’m always surprised how many businesses don’t know their keywords or haven’t taken any steps to figure them out.

An Easy Fix

We’re pretty far along in our sequence of SEO tips, and if you’re still able to execute this advice on your own, good for you. If you’re not in that boat, but your business heavily relies on internet traffic, it’s time to reach out to an expert. RTR Digital provides a variety of SEO related services, and you can have someone contact you by filling out a short form located here.

How The Model 3 is Destroying Tesla

Tesla Model 3

If the story of Tesla was somehow a metaphor for stories from the Bible, then the Model 3 is Judas making sure everyone at Tesla is on their way to the last supper, assuring their shepherd is approaching his final resting place (that cross is for you Elon). Maybe it was always Tesla’s destiny to be a sacrificial lamb of sorts, ending up in the same situation as many other pioneering companies, often not lasting long enough to see the technology they introduce make it to mainstream profitability. Ultimately, the Model 3 will bring forth a real test of faith in electric car kingdom that Tesla built.

You see, the Model 3 betrays everything consumers love about Tesla, and at the same time reveals those in charge of the company don’t understand their clientele at all. As it turns out, car companies in America only operate in two models, high volume or high margin, and with each comes a specific set of expectations that have to be met if you want to continue in that space. Tesla was the latter, high margin, but the Model 3 changed everything.

Exclusivity

The first expectation of running a high margin, or premium brand, is exclusivity, which when speaking plainly, means these brands produce a low volume of products. Premium brands often justify their product scarcity by including extravagant materials or assembly methods as a part of their production process, enabling product owners to reference things like hand-stitched leather, individually assembled, or first of its kind, when talking to others about their new toys.

Model X with Falcon Doors Open
Photo courtesy of Mashable.com

In Tesla’s case, it’s Falcon Wing doors on the Model X, Ludicrous mode on the Model S, and street legal lithium batteries on the Roadster, that check all the appropriate branding boxes for a premium brand. These features, combined with lower product availability, meant consumers looked forward to random encounters with the vehicles in real life, hoping to catch a glimpse of how a Tesla embodies the concept of cool. Then came the Model 3.

The Model 3 is a contradiction in how premium brands operate, and when Tesla announced it at a $35K price point with the specific goal of being a mass-market vehicle, I could almost hear the other Tesla owners cringing. In the minds of premium brand owners, the proliferation of the Tesla badge to everybody and their mother would seemingly make the symbol on their vehicle less valuable, as if they were mathematically averaging the prices of the cars together. American’s don’t tolerate this kind of behavior. You can’t use the same branding for bargain vehicles as you do for premium ones.

Tesla’s could have easily avoided this mistake by using the same branding strategy as every other car manufacturer in America. In “Merica,” car companies use different brands to divide their consumer base between their operating models, one brand for volume, and another one for margin. That’s why there’s a GM and Cadillac, Infinite and Nissan, Ford and Lincoln, etc.

This two prong approach has enabled U.S. car manufacturers to maintain a certain amount of exclusivity on some brands, while simultaneously achieving the cost efficiencies of scale with another. More importantly, the dual branding strategy protects another expectation of premium brands – cost.

The Cost Correlation

Time to Cost Correlation

When there’s a limited supply of anything, most of the time, the cost of that product naturally increases, delivering a price point that inherently leads to more margin. Premium brands use this natural correlation of exclusivity and cost to perpetuate their brands further, promoting an emotional response that evokes admiration and envy. The combination of these two emotions is what brand experts like to refer to as aspirational, and Ferrari is a perfect example of an aspirational brand.

Do you know why I don’t drive a Ferrari? I can’t afford one, and for the people that can, that is part of the allure of owning one. For everyone with the same budgetary constraints as myself, the astronomical price tag associated with a Ferrari isn’t off-putting, it provides an immediate understanding that a person driving one must be doing pretty well for themselves and makes us wonder how we can achieve the same thing.

Tesla’s vehicles used to inspire the same type of awe as a Ferrari when they pulled into a parking lot, but the release of a reasonably priced version calls everything we know about the brand into question. A Tesla never had the practicality of a Nissan Leaf or the design of a Toyota Prius, and surely didn’t carry a similar price tag. A Tesla was always expensive, exclusive, and impractical, just like an aspirational car brand should be. All of that went out of the window with the Model 3.

Before the Model 3, when people asked me about owning a Tesla, my answer was the same as it is concerning a Ferrari, “I can’t afford one.” Since the release of the Model 3, it’s different, when people ask me why I don’t drive a Tesla, I have to consider if I really want one. Being able to afford one has forced me to consider the features of a Tesla, like reliability, charging time, and driving distance. I had to ask myself, is this the best car for me at 35K? For a lot of consumers, the answer to that question is no, which proposes some harsh realities for Tesla, and the future of electric cars.

Tesla’s Red Pill

Red Pill and Blue Pill

The reason the Model 3 ruined everything about Tesla is that it snapped everyone back to reality, not just consumers, but Tesla was well. Besides exposing previously oblivious consumers to serious considerations about owning an electric vehicle, it also presented questions about Tesla as a car company. The effort to reach critical mass has surfaced several issues about various aspects of Tesla, making everyone consider if they have the production capacity, infrastructure, and sales tools of a high volume brand.

In the end, the production Model 3 broke the rules of a premium brand and made us all lose faith in the dream that made Tesla great. All we’re left with is the harsh reality of having taken the red pill rather than the blue one. I should have heeded the advice of Cypher in the Matrix and realized “ignorance is bliss.”

Feel free to leave comments, questions, or concerns about this article below.

Top Ten Tips: SEO Edition #7

SEO Tip 7

I often find it a bit depressing that opportunities in life are often dictated by who you know, and it didn’t make me feel any better when I learned that SEO is beholden to the same standard. To say that SEO Tip #8 and this one are entangled would be an understatement, as SEO Tip #8, if only for a brief moment, foreshadowed what was to come when it mentioned “link building” as a part of a successful SEO strategy. But a short paragraph won’t suffice for how important this aspect of SEO is, so this post is the full follow-up to that mention.

Link Building in Layman’s Terms

Chain Links

The easiest way to understand link building is by framing it as a metaphor for a letter of recommendation. When you’re searching for a new job or generally trying to build your resume, a letter of recommendation from a well-established individual, who holds higher prestige in your field goes a long way towards validating your claims of qualification for a particular position. Link building revolves around this concept.

At its core, a link from another website is a letter of recommendation from that site. Link building is about collecting as many letters of recommendations and referrals from other websites, whose influence and prowess are already established, as possible. The higher the ranking of the site providing the referral link, the more “equity” it carries to your site, which is why it’s important not to waste it with poor SEO strategies.

What makes link building so hard for the DIY, SEO crowd is the amount of footwork involved in obtaining these links. Did you really think it was going to be easy to convince a significant online player to post a link to your website? I bet you did because most people think it’s generally straightforward to accomplish, but in reality, it takes a massive amount of convincing, as established websites are well-aware they are putting their reputation on the line through the affiliation that link provides. So before you ask Google to link back to your website, maybe you should start with a list of easier targets.

Adding Links in Directories

SEO

The easiest way accomplish building your first set of links is by making sure you’re accurately listing your business in all of the relevant directories. Online directories are the digital equivalent of phonebooks (look it up Millennials), and registering your company in them is an easy way to establish some website links while also leveraging the existing online traffic of those sites.

While the links may be easy to obtain, this process will also be an introduction to the amount of legwork it takes to be a successful link builder. There are about ten directories you absolutely have to be in, and each one requires the business owner to complete a sign-up process, list out the company’s geographical information, upload a logo and pictures, write a description, etc. Here’s the list of the directories we find to be the most useful:

  1. Yelp
  2. Angie’s List (when applicable)
  3. YP (Yellow Pages)
  4. Manta
  5. Better Business Bureau
  6. City Squares
  7. USDirectory.com
  8. Local.com
  9. Merchant Circle
  10. EZlocal.com

 

Listing your business in most of the previously mentioned directories is free, but some require payment, and others have a premium tier of listing available. If you manage to get yourself through all ten and are somehow still in the mood for more tedious work to increase your online presence, you can acquire even more links through premium listings and industry-specific directories for your particular business category.

Search Engine Marketing (SEM) Services

I’ll be honest; most people aren’t up to the task of managing all of these directory listings. The number of usernames and logins alone is enough to drive a sane person mad. There are some subscription services available that manage these listings on your behalf, but it seems like a bit of a ripoff to pay a monthly fee for something that you should only need to do once, and then update annually. If you’re interested, the most popular service is probably Yext, but if you’re going to pay someone for search engine marketing, you might as well get a full package to make it worth your while.

Link building is only one aspect of SEM, and RTR Digital offers it as a part of a larger package that also includes more advanced webmaster techniques, like Google My Business and Bing/Yahoo Listings. When combined with social media management services, RTR Digital provides one of the most well rounded SEO/SEM packages available. If you’re interested in our SEO offerings and would like to start by taking advantage for of our free SEO evaluation offer you can contact us here.

Also, if you would like a full list of our SEO tips before they are released on our blog, you can find them here.

Feel free to leave any questions or comments regarding this post in the comments section, and start a meaningful conversation that could help your company breakthrough in the search engine results pages.

Top Ten Tips: SEO Edition #8

SEO Tip 8

It will only take me two paragraphs to explain why SEO Tip #8 is so important, the rest of this article is about what else you need to know to make sure you’re not making any mistakes related to it, and give you an idea of what kind of knowledge is required to reach the “first page” in 2019.

Link Equity

As a consensus, I think almost everyone in the SEO services sector will tell you that a site’s home page is the most important page for its ranking. It may not always contain the most specific information on products and services, but it is the page where the majority of other sites will direct visitors and those links impact SEO rankings in a particular way. Each link on the web brings equity, and every time visitors successfully follows a link to a page, the link transfers its weight to that page’s SEO ranking.

I’m not using the word, equity, in an abstract context to sound more intelligent. The term “link equity” is an industry term used to describe the way SEO authority passes from one site to another. Every time a user clicks a link with the expectation of being taken to a particular page and is redirected to an intermediate landing page, the equity of that link is also being diverted, wasting any ranking increase associated with it. Leading us to the conclusion – landing pages are bad.

Redirects

Redirect InfographicA temporary landing page is considered a form of redirect, one of many web developers have at their disposal, and there was a time when they were the latest craze, but it seems as though that time is fading fast. Companies tend to use landing pages to perform A and B testing, advertise a limited time promotion, or serve customers with a priority notice. Every time companies use a temporary landing page they are unknowingly preventing equity for their SEO ranking from being transferring the intended page.

Redirects themselves, are a necessity of the internet, but they should be avoided at all costs, as they always negatively impact a page’s SEO ranking. Regardless of how a developer deploys a redirect, pages visited as a result only capture a fraction of the equity intended for initial page. An incorrectly configured redirect transfers even less equity, so it’s important to know when, and how, to deploy them before using them on a website.

 

Building Equity

I’ve yet to see a page with perfect SEO because SEO algorithms are continually changing so there are always ways to improve. Outside of hiring a professional, here’s a short list of tactics you can use to get the most out of your existing links.

1. Link consistency – make all the links back to your site read identically. A small difference, like listing “http://” versus “https://” means a loss in equity, as moving a visitor to the secure version of a site still requires a redirect. If possible, link them directly to the final version of the page.

2. 301 Redirects Only – If you have to use a redirect, make it a permanent one, this enables the browser to save the information for future visits. Most browsers have a feature that allows them to automatically redirect themselves to the final version of a page once it encounters a permanent redirect.

3. Start Link Building – Much like the real world, the internet is all about who you know, and getting more popular sites to include links to your page will lift your page in the rankings. Think about how much credibility a direct link from Microsoft or Google would garner your page.

Get Expert Help

As someone who works in SEO services, I understand that this can all be a bit overwhelming. If you ever need additional assistance from RTR Digital, you can fill out a contact form here, and you should definitely download the full SEO tip sheet here.

Feel free to leave any comments or questions about this blog post, and we’ll answer them in a timely fashion.